Big Bad Wolf takes 3 million English-language books to Dubai next month as it debuts outside SE Asia

It was back in February that TNPS broke the news that the world’s biggest book sale would be heading for Dubai this year. World’s biggest book sale heading to Bangladesh, Dubai, Korea and Taiwan this year Now it’s official. Malaysia-based Big Bad Wolf, the World’s biggest book sale, will debut in Arabic-speaking Dubai, part of Read More …

Big Bad Wolf Malaysia and Indonesia this month as the world’s biggest book sale gathers momentum

As we come up to our first anniversary here at TNPS (September 25), one of the recurring themes has been the rise and rise of the international book sale phenomenon known as Big Bad Wolf. In the west it can sometimes seems like the only show in town in Amazon, and no question Amazon is Read More …

Setswana? Indonesian? Can you tell the difference? Nor can Microsoft

Oops! Twitter uses Microsoft for its translations. But Microsoft can’t tell the difference between Indonesian, widely spoken in Indonesia, SE Asia, and Sesotho, widely spoken in southern Africa, 6,000 miles away. Thankfully the Gaborone Book Festival in Botswana is also in English. That’s September 21-22. Follow the Gaborone Book Festival on twitter: @Gabsbookfest #GBF18 Follow Read More …

The Indonesia International Book Fair is underway. An analogue book fair in the world’s fifth largest country by internet users

With one million books up for grabs at big discounts this year’s Indonesia International Book Fair should pull in big crowds in what I regard as one of the planet’s most exciting publishing prospects. One million books at a book fair may sound like a lot, but it’s small beer compared to the 5.5 million Read More …

Uruguay’s Montevideo International Book Fair countdown begins. Ecuador guest of honour

When it comes to the global book markets, book fairs are often a better barometer of interest in books than book sales as reported by retailers. Vast numbers of books are sold at book fairs and festivals that are untracked by the retail stats counters and go largely unremarked on the Anglophone publishing circuit, where Read More …

Kazakhstan’s first children’s fantasy novel

The Moscow International Book Fair has just wound up (Sept. 5-9) and as yet little of interest has come across my desk to warrant coverage beyond noting that 100,000 visitors were expected. But the Moscow IBF encompasses not just Russia but also the Confederation of Independent States (CIS) and it is there that the “headline” Read More …

The Week In Review

Here’s a summary of TNPS posts from the past seven days. UK’s Bradford Lit Fest and USA’s Washington National Book Fest see record attendance Sharjah Publishing City sponsors Nigerian literature award Ireland: “A buoyant time for publishing.  One of today’s most vibrant book markets.” Sweden-based Arabic-language audiobook firm Kitab Sawti attracts new investment Peru exempts Read More …

Ghana International Book Fair mired by analogue pessimism when digital opportunities abound

As the build up to this year’s Ghana International Book Fair got underway last month is seemed optimism was the prevailing mood, with talk of how Accra might become a regional hub for Africa’s nascent publishing industry. The 2018 theme was “Revitalising the Book Chain for National and International Cooperation.” But reality took hold as Read More …

Ecuador’s FIL Guayaquil is underway. One more reminder that Latinos do read, given the chance

The 200th anniversary of Frankenstein and the 75th anniversary of The Little Prince are being celebrated at the 4th Guayaquil International Book Fair in Ecuador, which ends its five day run on Sunday (Sept 5-9). It’s just one of countless book fairs and festivals across Latin America that pass unnoticed by the outside world but Read More …

UK’s Bradford Lit Fest and USA’s Washington National Book Fest see record attendance

The UK’s Bradford Literature Festival launched in 2014 with a two-day event that attracted 968 people. As we all know, no-one reads books anymore because they are all too busy bingeing on Netflix or wasting their time on social media or (insert latest fashionable nonsense). So one can only guess at why the Bradford Literature Read More …